darksilenceinsuburbia:

Eliza Bennett

A Woman’s Work is Never Done

A series of photographic works titled ‘A Woman’s Work is Never Done’ Using my own hand as a base material, I considered it a canvas upon which I stitched into the top layer of skin using thread to create the appearance of an incredibly work worn hand.  By using the technique of embroidery, which is traditionally employed to represent femininity and applying it to the expression of its opposite, I hope to challenge the pre-conceived notion that ‘women’s work’ is light and easy.  Aiming to represent the effects of hard work arising from employment in low paid ‘ancillary’ jobs, such as cleaning, caring and catering, all traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’. 

The technique, I recall first applying to my hand under a table during a home economics class in school. I was totally amazed to find that I could pass a needle under the top layers of skin without any pain, only a mild discomfort.  As with many childhood whims it passed and I hadn’t thought any more about it until quite recently when I decided to apply the process to my hand to make it appear calloused and work worn like that of a manual labourer. Some viewers consider the piece to be a feminist protest, for me it’s about human value. After all, there are many men employed in caring, catering, cleaning etc… all jobs traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’. Such work is invisible in the larger society, with ‘A woman’s work’ I aim to represent it.  (artist statement)

Website

(via ellliot)

Timestamp: 1408350711

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Eliza Bennett

A Woman’s Work is Never Done

A series of photographic works titled ‘A Woman’s Work is Never Done’ Using my own hand as a base material, I considered it a canvas upon which I stitched into the top layer of skin using thread to create the appearance of an incredibly work worn hand.  By using the technique of embroidery, which is traditionally employed to represent femininity and applying it to the expression of its opposite, I hope to challenge the pre-conceived notion that ‘women’s work’ is light and easy.  Aiming to represent the effects of hard work arising from employment in low paid ‘ancillary’ jobs, such as cleaning, caring and catering, all traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’. 

The technique, I recall first applying to my hand under a table during a home economics class in school. I was totally amazed to find that I could pass a needle under the top layers of skin without any pain, only a mild discomfort.  As with many childhood whims it passed and I hadn’t thought any more about it until quite recently when I decided to apply the process to my hand to make it appear calloused and work worn like that of a manual labourer. Some viewers consider the piece to be a feminist protest, for me it’s about human value. After all, there are many men employed in caring, catering, cleaning etc… all jobs traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’. Such work is invisible in the larger society, with ‘A woman’s work’ I aim to represent it.  (artist statement)

Website

(via ellliot)

furples:

i-D Magazine
Model: Devon Aoki
Photographer: Kayt Jones

(via notyourlittleslave)

Timestamp: 1408294425

furples:

i-D Magazine
Model: Devon Aoki
Photographer: Kayt Jones

(via notyourlittleslave)

art-and-fury:

After the Head of ‘Giuliano di Medici’, Florence - Salvador Dali

(see previous)

(via erklgh)

Timestamp: 1405792576

art-and-fury:

After the Head of ‘Giuliano di Medici’, Florence - Salvador Dali

(see previous)

(via erklgh)

mmitchelldaviss:

Wink Space by Masakazu Shirane + Saya Miyazaki

Timestamp: 1405792571

mmitchelldaviss:

Wink Space by Masakazu Shirane + Saya Miyazaki

paintdeath:

Sato Kanae

(via erklgh)

Timestamp: 1405766145

paintdeath:

Sato Kanae

(via erklgh)

commandmodulepilot:

45 years ago, three astronauts blasted off on a mission to put man on the moon.

(via 0hb0llocks)

Timestamp: 1405766014

commandmodulepilot:

45 years ago, three astronauts blasted off on a mission to put man on the moon.

(via 0hb0llocks)

zv5:

Nam June Paik

TV Buddha, 1974 Video installation with statue.

Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam

(Source: wozniiak, via ellliot)

Timestamp: 1405765723

zv5:

Nam June Paik

TV Buddha, 1974 Video installation with statue.

Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam

(Source: wozniiak, via ellliot)

(via bowel)